Monday, December 8, 2014

TIES 14 Notes: Carl Hooker on Analog Leaders in a Digital World.

Carl Hooker spoke on Analog Leaders in a Digital World. Among other accomplishments, Carl developed the "SAMR Swimming Pool" Model, and I was excited to get a chance to meet him. 
Bridget Driscoll, the first person hit by a car, said she was bewildered by innovation. Do we want to be the ones driving or the ones hit by technology?

When it comes to learning, these things are changing about learning:
  • Who
  • What
  • When
  • Where

Who

(Sorry, I was late to the session. If anyone wants to share this part in the comments below, that would be awesome!)

What

Analog: Published by experts
Digital: Currated by everyone in the room

Hooker noted how news has changed from waiting till the paper edition the next day to seeing news happen in real time on Twitter now. The same is true in education today, where CK-12, iTunes U and OER Commons are available now, rather than paying for a textbook that is out-of-date the day it's published. Not only will teachers be creating their own books, but students can too!
Look at what happened to Blockbuster. 


On the backchannel on Todaysmeet, there was nice discussion about things that will be obsolete in our children's life-time. He also noted that today's school schedules are still similar to the TV Guide that we had growing up.
Is the digital change always best? Flipping?
The University of Phoenix today has 319,700 students! If people are doing this, what does that mean for us in K-12?

How

Analog: Delivered by Distributors
Digital: Delivered when needed with a menu of choices
Right now, content still comes from the teacher, but learning can happen in different ways. 
If we made a video in High School, we had to send it in snail mail if our grandparents wanted to view it. Today, in a few minutes, it's up on YouTube and they can comment on it.
How can we make this instant gratification used for good? He showed an example of a Roman Bathhouse that a student created in Minecraft, and then spoke in Latin to describe it.


Where

Analog: Static Location
Digital: Anywhere
The transistor radio had the same effect on the youth of the 1950's. It changed the music industry, because it was portable!
Our learning spaces today are still fairly static. 

He had us use physical movement to have us move based on how we felt about "Reality Television" and "Assessment." I found myself in the "Hate" category for the 1st, based on how it glorifies untalented/stupid people, and in the middle on assessment, if it allows for student feedback formatively and authentic project based for summative assessment. Others in the room were in the "Love" category for both, and "hate" category for both.

He shared a great image he created of an headstone for a student desk:

I'm glad that we have taken steps in Edina to explore other learning space options, like flexible tables and chairs, and more comfortable furniture as we move towards our Next Generation initiatives!
 

Carl is a great thought leader in educational technology, and it was great that he could come and share his vision at TIES 14! 
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