Skip to main content

The Side of Flipped Learning We Don't Always See

Often, when people talk about Flipped Learning, the focus is on the videos students sit and watch. Rarely, do we get to see how classroom pedagogy shifts. The other day, I came across this scene at one of our middle schools.


The teacher was working with a small group of students showing them how they would be using iPads to create their own videos for classmates on problems that were directly tied to power standards in math. His other students were in the classroom, organized in groups solving problems. By moving his instructional lecture to video, he was freed up to work with this small group. Too often, the focus of flipped is on the videos, and not enough is spent showing the classroom interaction that can occur because the lecture is online.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

#TIES18 Monday Keynote: Jaime Casap-The Problem Solving Generation

Jaime Casap, Education Evangelist with Google was the Monday Keynote at the 2018 TIES Conference
Jaime helped launch Google Apps, Chromebooks and helped found the Phoenix Coding Academy. He also teaches Communication to 10th graders. 
He authored the book, "On Our Street," a children's book about poverty. He grew up in Hell's Kitchen in the 70's, so he knows a little about the topic.
Education disrupts poverty! All of the milestones he has achieved were based on Education. He was invited to speak at the White House to help launch Michelle Obama's Reach Higher initiative. What we sometimes forget is that the impact we have on students goes on for generations! Since he went to college, her daughter just assumed that she would go on to college. The life his children have comes from the educators that impacted Jaime.
The State of EducationCasap doesn't think education is broken, because it worked for everyone in this room. AND it has changed in the last 100 yea…

Sometimes I Have to be the Fun Police...

Yesterday, I had two instances where I had to be the "Fun Police," in my role as Digital Learning Specialist. It is not a role that I rellish, as philosophically, I want our staff and students to have an authentic experience as possible and utilize tools that may be of benefit to their learning. However there are times, when for safety or due to missuse of a tool, I have to put on the hat and shades...
Case #1
The first instance was when I got a request for a group of 5th grade students to use Prezi as a presentation tool. Now Prezi may not be as popular as it was a few years ago, and some folks wish they had kept their "Classic" tools and format, but it still offers a nice way to make non-linear presentations.
However, for elementary educators, there is another component that makes Prezi problematic: their Terms of Service. Given this restriction, unless the student has been held back 3 years, odds are the 5th graders will not be able to use Prezi for their presentat…